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Control measure
Contain the animal

Control measure knowledge

Animals may need to be contained if they present a hazard, or if they need to be kept in a place of safety. It may be necessary to contain an individual animal or a group of animals; the method used may be purpose-made or improvised.

When improvising a containment structure, it should be of sufficient strength and of an appropriate design for the animal or animals to be contained safely.

Animals contained individually may exhibit greater signs of stress than animals contained in a compatible group; this may challenge the containment method.

If it is necessary to contain an animal for a length of time, consideration should be given to providing adequate ventilation, water and suitable food, and protection from the weather. Veterinary or other specialist advice about containment should be obtained at the earliest opportunity.

Containing the animal will vary depending on the species, the environment and the equipment available. Types of containment include:

  • Primary containment of larger animals
    • Carried out using purpose-made or improvised fencing, or a similar barrier, which is of sufficient strength and size to contain the animal or animals
    • Containment should reduce the undue stress or potential injury of the animal
    • Primary containment may also refer to purpose-built or permanent animal facilities
  • Secondary containment of larger animals
    • Methods of holding animals in a place of safety, away from sources of stimulation
    • Animals may be held in this area using personnel as an effective barrier to escape, or by using physical barriers such as temporary or electric fencing
  • Physical containment
    • Containment of smaller animals in purpose-made boxes, cages or animal carriers
    • Other bag-like items can be used, such as a sleeping bag or a swan bag
  • Containment in vehicles or trailers
    • If purpose-made and suitable (as detailed in Annex 1, Chapter II of The Council Regulation (EC) No 1/2005), these can be used for animals
    • Using vehicles or trailers for containment may not be appropriate in hot weather, as animals can quickly start to suffer from hyperthermia

Strategic actions

Fire and rescue services should:
  • Consider providing equipment appropriate for containing animals

Tactical actions

Incident commanders should:
  • Use appropriate places or equipment to contain the animal

  • Request veterinary or other specialist advice about containment

  • Monitor the welfare of an animal that has been contained